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Season 4, Episode 4

Finding the Hook That Makes Your Business Different

With Co Founder & CEO at WebinarNinja, Omar Zenhom

About the Episode

In this episode, I’m talking to Omar Zenhom, Co-Founder & CEO at WebinarNinja. This episode is incredible if you’re looking to launch or scale a product. He’s got a podcast called the $100 MBA that he started back in 2014 and has since had over 100 million downloads. He also has a thriving business called WebinarNinja, and over a million people have attended webinars through the platform. So how do you create two things? Not just one, but two things that at the same time scale so rapidly. Well, as you listened to this episode, you’ll see that it’s all about finding the hook in what makes you different and getting really connected with your customer. So he’s got some great tips here whether you’re starting or scaling a business.

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Full Transcript

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30:43

Chris:
What’s up, everyone. I’m Chris Ronzio, founder, and CEO of Trainual. And as always, we’re interviewing some top business experts to take a page out of their playbook. So you can put it in yours. You just heard Omar Zenhom. And this episode is incredible. If you’re looking to launch or scale a product, now he’s got a podcast $100 MBA that he started back in 2014 and has since had over 100 million downloads. That is rare air if you’ve ever started or tried to start a podcast. But in addition to that, he also has a business, a thriving business Webinar Ninja, and over a million people have attended webinars through Webinar Ninja. So how do you create two things? Not just one, but two things that at the same time scale so rapidly. Well, as you listen to this episode, you’ll see that it’s all about finding the hook in what makes you different and getting really connected with your customer. So he’s got some great tips here on whether you’re starting or scaling a business, and this is a fun interview. Check it out. Yeah. Welcome back, everyone. I’m your host, Chris Ronzio. And as you heard in the intro today, we’re talking with Omar. Zenhom what’s up, man.

Omar:
Hey, it’s good to be here, Chris.

Chris:
Yeah. And we’re going to get to that. As soon as people heard in the intro, you’ve got a podcast that has been top of the charts, like close to a hundred million downloads. Did I get that number right? Yeah. Well, we’re over that now? Yeah. Over a hundred million. Okay. So I have an old bio. Incredible. So you should really be doing the interview here and I hope to pull this off. Okay. But, um, you’ve built a couple of incredible businesses including the podcast. And I want to talk about your background and give people some pages out of your playbook, as we like to say. So why don’t we start with how you started? Have you always been an entrepreneur or what were you doing before starting these companies?

Omar:
I haven’t always been an entrepreneur. I actually was an educator for 13 years. It was a high school university teacher. Uh, my dad was in sales. He was actually in car sales. So the, you know, the stereotypical, uh, thing you think about in terms of sales and businesses, that was my dad. My dad was the guy who sold you a car. Um, and growing up in that environment as a kid, you know, uh, if, if anybody has a relative or a family member that works in sales, you know, it’s, you know, it’s up one year, it’s down the next, you know, one summer vacation, you’re going to Disney world the next to the backyard. Right. So, um, I just kind of did it like that growing up. I didn’t, you know, so I was like, you know what, I’m going to go for the most stable thing.

Omar:
You know, I don’t want to go to the military. I don’t want to be a doctor, so everybody needs teachers, so I’ll be a teacher. Um, and that’s kinda, that was my path. You know, I kind of said, you know, I’m going to be a teacher. I have a kind of a middle-class job and that’s going to be my life. Um, the funny thing is, is that the internet came around and it was, I was very curious about the internet. I was like, what is this thing? And, you know, um, and I just started doing little experiments on it and things like that. Um, the one person in my family that is entrepreneurial is my uncle, my mom’s brother. Um, and he, he wasn’t super close to us growing up. He would visit us maybe once or twice a year. Um, I didn’t know much about him, but when I grew up, grew as an adult, when I started my career as a teacher, um, I, I started to get to know him a little bit.

Omar:
He would come and visit me. Um, and he kind of planted the seed of what is possible. And this world of entrepreneurship, I was like, what in the world is this? Um, but, um, you know, the first thing he did is he gave me a book, gave me a book called Rich Dad Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki, um, in, yeah, I mean, a lot of people read this book as the first kind of entry point into business. Um, and, uh, the next time he visited me, we’d discuss the book and it wasn’t like an official book club or anything like that, but it was just natural. He would just, he would give me a gift. What’d you think that book, what did it like? We would talk about it like, oh, I never thought about it that way. You know, like I was never thought you could make money on it a different way and all that kind of stuff.

Omar:
And then the next book he gave me was, uh, how to win friends and influence people by Dale Carnegie. And it was just a little bit of a, you know, a, a sort of cycle we went through and it also helped. I’m a real big believer that you have to see it to believe it. Right. You have to see something right. Manifest, like, and it’s good just to see an example of somebody making money in a different way. Wow. I never know that was possible outside the book, just looking at my uncle. Right. Um, so I started making, doing some experiments on the side, on, on, on the internet. I had an eBay store. He did an arbitrage with like air Jordans before, like there were like, this was a thing, you know, and I, you know, and I started building bigger and bigger experiments, bigger, I would say, I guess, smaller businesses on the side, um, and started to just, you know, earn my chops and just learn a little bit more about business, uh, as I was a teacher for 13 years.

Omar:
Um, but let me ask you, so like, why did you leave education? The funny thing is that I was really good at my job, you know, at 25, I was the head of the department. I was managing teachers twice my age. I was really good at my career. It’s really hard to leave a career. You’re good at, you know, it’s easy to kind of quit when you’re kind of frustrated and not doing well. But I hit a point in my career where I was the head of the department at the university I was working at, um, the chair, uh, which is the next position over, um, left the university. And I was next in line. So I was acting chair. So I was doing the person’s job for about a year and a half. And I was like, okay, wow, a year and a half. At that point, it was like, you know, when they gonna officially give me the position.

Omar:
So I went to my supervisor, who was the Dean? I said, Hey, um, I asked her, you know, what’s going on? You know, I’ve been doing a great job. I’m hitting all my milestones, all the KPIs, everything, you know, what am I going to get this position? And, and she was just like, well, um, she kind of broke down in front of me and just couldn’t hide the truth that she just said. I know from good authority from the director that he wants to make an outside hire for this position. And just at that moment, I just felt totally powerless. I felt like, wow, I’m busting my here trying to make this happen. And I, uh, I just, I have no control over my destiny. Like no matter what I do, somebody else is gonna make a decision. And, uh, all my hard work is not going to be B doesn’t matter, you know? Um, and I, I say at that moment, my frustration, I grew my fear where I got to the point where it’s just like, anything’s better than this. I’m going to leave. I’m going to put all my effort into building something for myself. Um, and I left education and it was a big, big jump for me to go into entrepreneurship.

Chris:
Yeah. So at the time, did you have one of these side hustles that was, you know, like attractive that you thought, Oh, I can go full-time on this thing? Or were you just starting from scratch with no idea?

Omar:
The funny thing is, is that one of the side hustles I had that was quite successful was my own clothing line. I used to do custom clothing lines for men. Like you would send in your measurements and I would send you a custom shirt and things like that. So perfect. Fit it all back in. Yeah, it was back in 2010, 12. It was very early days, but I just closed that business, uh, and got out of it. Um, but the funny thing is, is that I knew that I can at least do some business consulting because a lot of my friends and family who are new to the internet, um, would ask me like, Hey, I’m thinking about starting a blog, I’m starting a business. What’s the e-commerce store. And I would give this advice for free. And I would just be like, Hmm, maybe I should start charging for this.

Omar:
Maybe we should make this something, you know, and that’s kind of the first thing I did is actually help people start businesses, start their websites. Um, actually the first thing I did and I have to say this because a lot of people think it’s just like a bed of roses. Um, the first thing is that I just cut all my expenses. I just like got super frugal. I sold my car, I moved to a city with good transit. I just literally just said, you know what, the least, you know, the lower amount of money I spend, the better chance I have to like, kind of survive as long as possible to like build my business and be able to kind of, uh, you know, grow.

Chris:
I love that. You’re saying that because a lot of people don’t think of that, but when you make the leap into entrepreneurship, it’s not that you need to replace a hundred percent of your salary. If you’re living in a kind of like a breakeven kind of place, then if you cut your expenses in half, you only need to replace half of your salary. Right. So might as well make it easier on yourself.

Omar:
Totally, totally. And a lot of people, this is harder for some people than others, because they have families, they have significant others have kids, and that transition might be so hard for them. What I try to tell them is that you know, this is temporary, you know, like you can move for a couple of years, lower your expenses, trade up the Lexus for a Camry, whatever, and you’ll be fine, you know? And then you can get the Bentley later or whatever the point is, is that like, it’s really, these things don’t really matter that much. I look back at my own childhood and like, I look back, I was like, Oh, we actually didn’t have that much money, but I didn’t even notice that, you know, like, all you notice is like the time you have your, your, your parents and, you know, the dinners and playing Jenga with my mom and whatever, like, that’s all you care about really. And sometimes we overdramatize in our head, like, this is a huge change. It’s not that huge. You’re not going to be home.

Chris:
You’re not losing important things. Okay. So, so you make the pivot from teaching and did that bridge right into the hundred dollar MBA or where, where did that start?

Omar:
Yeah. So when I’m at this point, I’m like 31 32. And, uh, you know, it’s, it’s a tough time to transition because you invested like a lot of time and money into education, your degrees time. Um, and then when I made that transition and I was starting my, my business consulting, to be quite honest, I was, I was a little bit insecure because I wanted to start becoming like a business coach and mentor and show people how to start businesses and kind of walkthrough rock through those steps and kind of avoid the mistakes I made throughout the years, but I was very insecure about it. So I actually decided to go to Wharton, uh, business school. I applied and I went there for a semester cause it was like, Hey, I’ll get my MBA. And you know, I’ll have that on my kind of that badge of honor.

Omar:
Um, but a semester in my marketing professor, there was kind of pulled me aside. He’s like, what are you doing here? Like, you’re, you’re in your thirties. Um, you know, you don’t fit the profile of somebody who gets their MBA. And I was like, oh, I’m here because I want to be a great entrepreneur. And I thought, I’d get my MBA and that’s the way to do it. And he was just like, shook his head and like disappointment and confusion and just, wow. You know, he’s like, you’re, you, you don’t get an MBA for that. You’re going to be able to get a, you know, six-figure job at Goldman Sachs or Morgan Stanley or something like that.

Chris:
Like the department store, Santa Claus that sent you to like a different place. He’s like, no, don’t pay your tuition to go, just start a business.

Omar: (11:03)
Yeah. He was just like the things that you already learned through building businesses that I had a business already at the time. And, and he was just like, we don’t want monopoly of education. You can learn this stuff outside. And for me, I was just like, it was like a moment of clarity. It was like, I’m really here because I need a permission slip for myself. Like I’m just trying to prove it to myself. And I thought, how many people are in this position where they’re like, I just need to know some basic skills about, you know, business planning, idea, validation, marketing, sales, finance. So I could be able to start my small little business to be able to start growing. Um, and I don’t necessarily want to dump a hundred thousand dollars on an MBA education at this point in my career.

Omar:
Uh, so that’s kind of where the $100 MBA came from. I was like, it’s a little bit of a, uh, you know, it’s a bit sarcastic, but as you know, you pay a hundred dollars and you learn what you need to know to get instead of a hunch, you spend a hundred dollars bucks. Yeah. So did it start as a podcast or was the course first or how did it, how to get started? So the course was first, we started the course, um, we launched with about 120 videos on all these different types of things. I talked about marketing sales, finance ideas, validation, hiring, all that kind of stuff. Um, and it, it was really geared to people who are in their second career. They are just looking to start something, their only person right now, maybe they’ll start hiring one or two people, and they’re just trying to replace their income and get out of the rat race.

Omar:
Um, so, uh, that core started first. And then from there, uh, we actually started a different podcast. A lot of people don’t know about this, but we had a different podcast. It was called people who know their, right. It was a podcast that we launched about 46 episodes. It wasn’t like, you know, we thought it was pretty cool. We had a lot of great guests with Gary Vaynerchuk on, we had Jordan Harbinger was really a lot of fun. Unfortunately, the podcast itself was. It wasn’t, it wasn’t good, you know, and it wasn’t hitting the mark. Like, uh, for us, we really wanted to have a larger audience, uh, because we believe that if we can cultivate a great community, great audience, then eventually we can add value to that audience. And then, you know, a portion of those people will become customers. Um, but on a good day, we’d get like 400 downloads on an episode.

Omar:
And it was very disappointing because we really gave it a good shot, 46 episodes weekly. It was really, really tried hard. Um, but you know, we realize we’re failing here. Something’s going wrong here. So, um, we actually did Nicole and me, and Nicole is my, my wife and co-founder. And we, we went on a road trip from California, New York, and we had some time in the open road just to really just be honest with ourselves. Like, why is this not working like what’s going on? And the podcast is an interview podcast. And we would interview people and talk about their journey and all that kind of stuff. And then we realized, you know what, we’re not really using our strengths. Like I got really real. I looked at the top business podcasts on iTunes. I looked at, you know, Tim Ferriss who has like five New York times bestseller, all, all this guy does is win.

Omar:
How am I going to compete with this guy? How am I going to compete with Jordan Harbingers and podcasting before the iPhone? How am I going to compete with Pat Flynn, who is adored by so many fans and, you know, has a head start, like I have to get real, how am I going to what’s my angle here, right? If I’m just doing another me-too podcast. Yeah. Um, and I realized, you know, like my strength is really that I’m a great teacher. Like I, I have a master’s in education. I taught for 13 years. I’m pretty confident I can teach better than all these people. So why am I interviewing people on a podcast? So, uh, the other insight we had is like, Nicole loves languages. And one of her favorite podcasts is like coffee for coffee, break, French, cut brick for Spanish, which is like daily language lessons.

Omar:
So, uh, we thought, no, one’s really doing this in business. So what we did, we married these two ideas and said, let’s do daily short business lessons where I just teach a business lesson every single day, five days a week. Um, and it’s just 10, 15 minutes long. And it just a very actionable item. Like, you know how to make your first hire, how to start with Facebook marketing, just something that gets them to do something by the end of the episode. Um, and that’s when the $100 MBA show was born. Uh, we launched in August of 2000 S 2014. So it’s been six years now, August 2014. Um, and it was, we had a good launch and we were doing well and we’re top of iTunes and all that kind of stuff. But, you know, it’s still early days really don’t know what’s going on. Um, but in all, in December of that year, we won best of iTunes, which is only given to like the top 10 podcasts in iTunes, over hundreds of thousands of podcasts. Like unbelievable. Yeah. So it was just for us were like that moment where like, okay, we’re doing something that really resonates.

Chris:
So I want to pause here because of what you said there about how to make your podcast different. And if anybody’s listened to this podcast and has heard my daily lessons, we used to be a weekly podcast. Then we went to a daily lessons podcast. This is where the daily lesson came from. Now. They know the origin of where the daily lessons podcasts came from. You started this. So you did something different that made the podcast blow up. When there was just a lot of me-too copycat kind of stuff going on. That’s a problem. A lot of people have in a business where they’re just doing what everyone else is doing. They have trouble blowing something up, whether it’s their podcasts that only get the 400 downloads or their SAS product or their service that only gets a handful of customers. So I want to pivot over to webinar Ninja and talk about how you applied that same lesson, that same principle to really grow that business. So how did, how did a webinar Ninja started had had a, you started around the same time, right?

Omar:
Uh, it was in, uh, April 16. Um, I was running webinars to sell the course a hundred MBA, and I really hated all the tools are out there. They were clunky, they were very hard to use, but most of all, like I had to Frankenstein other pieces of software with it to make it work in terms of the whole marketing funnel of it. Like from the landing pages to the thank you pages, the registration, the automated emails, the replay, all the follow-up sequences, all that kind of stuff like hacking, but actual, yeah. The actual webinar software doesn’t do that. I had to add four or five different pieces of the thing. And I had to build this thing every single week would take me like two hours every single week, but I did it because it worked, it was helping my business. Yeah. So, um, the funny thing is, is that, you know, I would document all these steps and like, how do you pull this together?

Omar:
How do you add these things and make this happen? And then how do you make sure that it’s successful? And I thought, Hey, this is a great product. People are going to love how to learn, how to pull this together and, um, and, and run their webinars every week. So I created something called a DIY webinar guide, um, which is an actual guide. And there was also like, a course attached to it and all that kind of stuff. And I spent like a few months creating this mean, Nicole really worked hard on this and we launched it like, this is gonna be great, man. And it was gonna save everybody is energy everybody’s time. Um, we launched it and we’re like, this is going to go gangbusters. We had two sales, the whole three months of work to sales for this DIY webinar guide.

Omar:
And that’s not the worst of it. One of those sales was a chargeback, right? So any other sale was, was John Lee Dumas, a friend of ours who just is interested in what we’re doing. So I want to, I want to go to a quote from, uh, from Ben Horowitz in his book, the hard thing about hard things. He says, sometimes you have to create a bad product to create a great product, right. And, and that was my moment where it’s like, Oh, people don’t want to do the work, right. They actually just want a solution to do the work for them. Um, and at the same time, I was kind of playing around with my limited PHP and HTML skills, creating a little software, uh, to make my life easier, creating webinars. I started running it and my attendees were like, Hey, what are you using for this webinar?

Omar:
It’s like, Oh, it’s just something I slept together and make my life easier. And they’re like, well, can we buy it? The lesson I learned from the DIY webinar guys, like, you know, you gotta make, make people put their money where their mouth is. So what we did to do pre-sold webinar Ninja four months in advance, we had, I put together a very sloppy landing page sales page, the one-page thing with just mock-ups of what it looks like in Photoshop, what it’s gonna, you know, what it’s gonna look like when I sell it to customers and just said, Hey, these are the things that it solves. These are the problems it solves. This is how it’s gonna save you time and money. Um, if you’re interested, you can pre-order and buy now and you’ll get in four to five months. Um, and I was just like, let’s see what her Kickstarter basically.

Omar:
I just, and I literally, I just PR a lot of people like, so who do you know, did you have big email lists? Like, no, I had, like, I literally, at the time, I think I had 1200 people on my email list. And, but that was not what moved the needle will move the needle is I saved all the emails, all the context of everybody I met at any conference. I went to a few conferences that year. Uh, people that I really look up to people that, you know, that we’re just getting started back then, like Nathan Barry from ConvertKit or Cobra Barb from fizzling and all that stuff. And I would email these people personally on Gmail and say, Hey guys, you know, are out individually. Like, Hey Nathan, what’s up, man. I just want to touch base with you. Listen, I’m launching something new.

Omar:
Um, I didn’t ask them to buy or anything. I just said, Hey, I want something new. If your community thinks to do useful share with them, if you don’t no problem, you can share any way you want on your newsletter on social media. It’d be awesome. Um, and that really helped because people just love to support other people. You’re not asking to buy anything. You just ask them to share it. And if it’s useful, and obviously if you have a synergy in the audiences that helped. So when we launched, uh, we sold out in 48 hours, our first 150 beta spots. And that moment we’re like, okay, validation. This is a pain. People are solving so much that they’re willing to put money down without even getting the solution yet. It’s crazy.

Chris:
What was, so was it like a, like a JV thing, like an affiliate, or were they just showing out of the goodness of their heart?

Omar:
No JV, nothing just, you know, and I have endless stories about like, just the relationships that I’ve built over the years. Uh, Michael Port, New York Times bestseller, a guy just had dinner with, got to know a little bit, um, you know, he just was like, I want to support you. It’s like, Hey, I’ll Cal. I have an affiliate was like, I don’t affiliate link, dude. Let’s just, you, you, you, you seem like a good guy and whatever. And, and at a certain level in business, you know, that at some point you’re going to return the favor, you know, at some point you’re going to be able to, uh, help and support them as well. So we relaunched 150 beta users, uh, we said, okay, let’s see if there’s any more interest. So we opened it up for another a hundred users and that’s allowed 24 hours.

Omar:
We were like, okay, do we have 250 beta users? Uh, and we have a bit of cash now. So we invested in a really good, uh, developer to clean things up. Cause, um, I was just playing around and trying to figure things out, um, for commercial use. Um, and we released a little bit late. We didn’t launch on time and, but we got a lot of great feedback when we were in beta and you know, those 250 initial users really informed the product too. And they’re our biggest fans, even today, six years later with over, you know, 15,000 users and over a million people have attended a webinar on WebinarNinja. So it’s, it’s that core group really helped us get off the ground, but also improve the product from the beginning. Wow.

Chris:
All right. So I mean, the couple of lessons I heard they’re pre-selling something before it even exists is brilliant. And I think that so many people that are listening to this contest, the demand of the market, but what would you have done if you sold five of them? You know, if you didn’t sell out, would you have just emailed those people and say, sorry, we’re not building this. Was there a threshold for what demand proving demand looks like?

Omar:
Well, my game plan was is that depending on the numbers, like, say, for example, five people bought, I would email these people and ask them, you know, um, uh, why did you buy, what are the things that interested you or some things that kind of like had you on the, you know, on the fence, just to learn a little bit more about that before I just said, pull the plug, then I would email people that didn’t buy and be like, Hey, cool, no problem. Well, what you can do for me is give me some feedback. I would love to know why you didn’t buy, uh, was it the price? Was it the features? Was it like, you know, um, something else, you know, and, and just learning a little bit more about, uh, what’s going on. Cause you might be able to treat the product and then be able to, uh, offer another offer to these people and, and, and, and figure it out. But, um, and of course, you know, I haven’t built anything yet. So if I, if I said no, and I gave people, you know, the refund, that’s fine. Cause I didn’t spend the money until we knew for sure that we’re going to build it. And that’s okay. It’s okay. It’s better for you to do that than waste your time and waste your energy.

Chris:
You say you got a lot of good feedback and you’re, re-engineering how you’re going to build it, and stay tuned. Right? So I love the focus on the customers, whether they’re beta users or even people that said no. And taking that feedback to craft it into your, your eventual product. So in talking about webinar Ninja, then it scaled a lot over the years, you said almost a million people are over a million. People have watched a webinar with WebinarNinja incredible. So I know webinars when you started this probably wasn’t as popular and now it’s, it’s flooded. There are tons of them going on. And a lot of people produce really horrible webinars. So do you have any tips on how to, how to get your, your content across and, and make it something people want to attend? Totally.

Omar:
Um, so one of the reasons I think people are attracted to WebinarNinja our brand is that we approach webinars in a different way, not only with just the software, um, but just our whole approach. Um, a lot of people are just tired of the overly hyped-up sales, marketing, kind of strategies that some other platforms do. Um, and so my advice for anybody that wants to do webinars properly want to have higher conversions want to be able to, uh, be able to benefit from anybody who registers on their webinar for the long run is to have one singular goal. A lot of people just, get overwhelmed. They think about a million things like how many registered some of my conversion rates in the price of my product and my offer and the script I have to say and all this stuff. And what about the stacking of the value?

Omar:
All this stuff. Just relax. Okay. Right. All you need to do is focus on one thing. And the only thing you need to focus on is building trust. A webinar is an audition is a chance for you to earn trust with your audience. They’re going to give their name and email and their time in exchange. You got to show them that you have their back, that you have their best interest in mind that you’re going to give them something that makes them feel like I got a win that this person actually delivered value. And then try to just fleece me while I’m on the webinar automatically by doing that, that differentiates you. Number two, it makes people feel like, Hey, I trusted them with my time, my name, and email address, they delivered. There’s a good chance that if I get my money, they’re going to deliver as well.

Omar:
So you have to see it as an audition and everything you do on a webinar, you have to ask us, does this build trust or break trust? If it breaks, I don’t do it. If it builds, I do it. And even in the offer part, a lot of people ask me like, how do I transition from a workshop to an offer, be honest with them and be like, Hey, we did a great workshop and you can run with this. Right. But I built something that allows you, to apply what we just learned with far greater ease. Would you like to see it? That sounds cool. All right. Let me show you what it is and just be transparent. Let people know you have a business. People know that you have a product, but if you just flat out say, and you do deliver value, um, you’re going to really benefit in the long run because here’s the secret that no one wants to talk about.

Omar:
It can make anybody buy anything. You can’t make anybody buy anything. But what you can do is build trust. Why? Because if they don’t buy today, they’re not going to go shopping around when they’re ready to buy. They’re not, no one wants to shop around and compare things like, they’re just gonna be like, okay, I’m just gonna go back to Omar because I’ve got a lot of value from that webinar. And I’m now I’m ready to do webinars. So I’m going to go with him, right? So you have to think long-term and not think like, oh, I gotta get the sale right now on this webinar. And I got to put all this pressure on scarcity and all that stuff. No, that’s short-term gains. What we want to do here is build trust with our audience focused on that.

Chris:
Totally aligned. Okay. And so before we wrap this up, I’m curious, you know, you, you, we talk about webinars for sales. That’s what most people think of. We’ve been running the most webinars for our existing customers to just continue to build that trust and retention relationship. Is there, are there other ways you’re seeing people use webinars today?

Omar:
Yeah, totally. A lot of our users use webinars in different ways. Some of the ways that really have been interesting are they’ll run webinars for onboarding new customers. So a new customer will come in and they want to hold them by the hand and show them, Hey, this is not overwhelming. This is easy. This is the first step steps. You got a date to take to set up your, your account or to take the first module in this course, or, you know, just, just to feel a little bit more comfort. And this could be an automated series. This could be, uh, you know, a, a session sessions that are live or open Q and a. So this has been a huge, huge thing that people have been starting to do. We also encourage people because we do this in our own team is run webinars internally for our team.

Omar:
So, uh, for training purposes, onboarding new employees, understanding our customers and avatars, and understanding what’s going on. So it allows you to automate that kind of training as well as just having had a way to interact with your team in a way that they can ask questions and be able to get a pulse on, maybe run around a pole and figure out where they’re at in their learning comprehension since that point. So these are just a couple of ways people have been using it. Uh, I also love, uh, running automated webinars, uh, with the purpose of qualifying them for a live webinar. You know, some of our clients, have maybe a higher ticket priced items, whether it’s a 2,005,000, $10,000 contract, something like that. And that’s a that’s a tough thing to just sell it in a webinar right away. So it’s a good way to run an automated webinar where you talk about your philosophy, your product, your business, and then the call to action on the automated webinars. Like, Hey, why don’t you join my live webinar? I’ll tell you what I offer as a service. What’s great about that is, first of all, it filters out all the buyers. And then when you get on that live webinar, it’s an open game. You could sell all you want because that’s what they’re there. Yeah. So it just, it just makes it a whole lot easier.

Chris:
I love those tips. Okay. Well, think of this podcast, anyone that’s listening, this is kind of like Omar’s audition, right? It’s like a webinar. You just got so many nuggets of value from him. If you’ve listened to his podcast, you’ve been getting those for years. Um, but where can people find you if they want to, if they built, you’ve built some trust with them and they want to go deeper.

Omar:
Um, I always point people to the podcast. If you’re just getting started in business, it’s probably the best thing you can do is it’s just a daily 10-minute bell podcast, absolutely free on any podcast app you use called the hundred dollar MBA show. Um, it’ll give you some momentum. It’ll give you a little bit of motivation and I try as much as possible to push you to the next level and give you challenges to take every day. So start with that. If you’re interested in learning more about running webinars, if you go to webinarninja.com, we have a lot of free resources. We’ve got full guides, we have a seven-part course you can take for free, uh, a lot of stuff that to help you just get over that first webinar and feel confident. Um, so yeah, those are the two resources I would recommend. That’s perfect.

Chris:
Great. Well, thank you so much for sharing with everybody today. You are obviously a great teacher. You’re amazing at what you do. I can’t wait until I can see you in person again at one of those events, but we’ll, uh, we’ll catch up soon. Thanks so much for being here.

Omar:
Thanks, Chris.

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