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EOS® - How To Build an Accountability Chart Process Template

The EOS Accountability Chart is a tool used by organizations to delineate clear roles, responsibilities, and reporting structures. Learn how to build one for the business.

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EOS® - How To Build an Accountability Chart Process Template

The EOS Accountability Chart is a tool used by organizations to delineate clear roles, responsibilities, and reporting structures. Learn how to build one for the business.

Introduction

What Is an Accountability Chart?

The Entrepreneurial Operating System (EOS) Accountability Chart is a tool used by organizations to delineate clear roles, responsibilities, and reporting structures. 

Unlike a traditional organizational chart, it emphasizes accountability and function over hierarchical relationships. The chart organizes the business into major functions, often helmed by an integrator who harmoniously synchronizes these functions. It's common to have separate segments for sales and marketing, operations, and finance. 

In some structures, a visionary role exists above the integrator, offering big-picture insights and creative direction. 

Each major function in the chart is further defined by five pivotal roles, ensuring every aspect of the business is covered. This clarity in roles and responsibilities ensures that each person is operating within their unique ability, optimizing both efficiency and productivity. The EOS Accountability Chart is instrumental in fostering a transparent organizational culture, promoting open communication, and minimizing cross-departmental issues.

Why Our Business Uses an Accountability Chart

In our quest to achieve operational excellence, we've implemented the EOS Accountability Chart. It's more than just an organizational tool—it crystallizes roles, responsibilities, and the reporting structure, ensuring every team member knows their place and purpose. 

With clear delineations, we avoid the chaos of overlapping duties and maintain a streamlined decision-making process. And as we grow, this chart guides our expansion, ensuring new roles align with our core functions. 

We've noticed improved communication, minimized departmental friction, and heightened efficiency. By placing the right people in the right seats, we can harness their unique abilities, propelling our business to the next level of success.

Our Accountability Chart

How To Build an Accountability Chart

When we built our Accountability Chart for the first time, we used the following process:

1. Understand its purpose: The Accountability Chart isn't just another organizational tool. It's designed to help identify the major functions of the business, ensure clear accountability, and enable optimal functioning of the company.

2. Identify the major functions: Determine the three major business functions: sales and marketing, operations, and finance and administration. Remember, these may further split based on the business' nuances. For example, sales and marketing might divide into separate sales and marketing roles.

3. Determine the leadership roles: Some businesses may have both a visionary and an integrator. The visionary typically fuels the business with ideas and maintains key relationships, while the integrator manages the day-to-day operations, ensuring harmony between all major functions.

4. Define roles for each function: For every major function, specify five primary roles. For instance, the visionary function might have roles like R&D/ideas, creative problem-solving, maintaining major relationships, ensuring culture, and selling.

5. Avoid overlapping duties: A vital principle to adhere to is to ensure only one person is in charge of any major function. If there are multiple names in a box, it's an indicator of potential chaos. The aim is to ensure clear responsibility, meaning when more than one person is accountable, nobody truly is.

6. Construct the structure first: Before assigning names to roles, first establish the structure that works best for the business. This will help with objectivity and prioritization of organizational needs over individual ones. Think about the functions necessary at every level of the organization.

7. Assign the right people: Once your structure is set, it's time to put the right people in the right seats. Look for alignment with the roles and their unique abilities. Consider the GWC model: Does the person Get the role? Do they Want it? And do they have the Capacity to do it well?

8. Account for scalability: The Accountability Chart should be adaptable. As roles expand, like having multiple salespeople or customer service representatives, denote the number of individuals in that role instead of adding more boxes.

9. Share and implement: Replace any existing organizational chart with the new Accountability Chart. Share it with everyone in the company, ensuring all know where they fit and their specific accountabilities.

10. Confirm its Effectiveness: Ask the leadership team three critical questions to ensure the chart's effectiveness:

  • Is this the right structure to propel the business to the next level?
  • Are the right people in the appropriate seats?
  • Does everyone have sufficient time to perform their roles effectively?

An Accountability Chart Template

Example of EOS Accountability Chart

Similar Templates

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