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Season 02, Episode 28

How To Turn Your Natural Skills And Passion Into Profit

with The Growth Architect and Founder of The Women’s Code, Beate Chelette

About the Episode

In this episode, I chat with Beate Chelette, The Growth Architect and founder of The Women’s Code. What I liked about this episode was her passion for small businesses and growing businesses. She developed a framework for scaling a business from the idea, the inception, all the way into building the systems and training that Trainual specializes in.
Beate was once $135,000 in debt as a single parent when she bootstrapped her passion for photography into a highly successful global business and eventually sold it to Bill Gates in a multimillion-dollar deal. She’s provided training for tens of thousands of Founders, SmallBusiness Owners, and Entrepreneurs with her framework. HuffPost calls her one of ‘50 Must-Follow Entrepreneurs’.

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Full Transcript

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Beate:

I’ve developed something that I called a five-star success blueprint. So I’ve built thousands and thousands and thousands of businesses, uh, for, you know, many of my clients. And there is a particular blueprint really on how business is being built. You do not have to reinvent the wheel because in, in the cadence of a business build thing, I’ve identified it as my five-star success blueprint in the first step, you’ve turned the talent into a business, transforming passion into profits.

Beate:

What’s up everyone. I’m Chris Ronzio, CEO & founder, and CEO of Trainual And this is Process Makes Perfect. As always, we’re talking with experts in process creation, automation, delegation, all of the people that know how to make business easier. You just heard Beate Chelette. And this episode is the process of going from passion to profit. Beata is a growth architect and the founder of the woman’s code, which is a professional development company, specializing in growing building and scaling businesses. She was once $135,000 in debt as a single parent. When she bootstrapped her passion for photography and do a highly successful global business and eventually sold it to Bill Gates in a multimillion-dollar deal. She’s provided training for tens of thousands of founders, small business owners, and entrepreneurs with her framework and HuffPost calls her one of the 50 must-follow entrepreneurs. What I liked about this episode, you’ll hear from the very beginning that she has this passion for small business and growing businesses.

When she struggled herself, she actually emailed or sent a letter at the time to the president of the United States. And you’ll have to listen to hear how that turned out. But Beate has developed this system, this five-step system, which is a framework for scaling a business from the idea, the inception all the way into building the systems and training that train you all specializes in. So you heard earlier in the season, cleat masks talk about the different levels of business from a revenue standpoint. And in this episode, you’ll hear, [inaudible] speak to the mindset challenges that you have at each of those stages. So I loved talking with her about the things you need to overcome, and I think you’ll get a lot out of this episode, take a listen,

Chris:

Welcome to Process Makes Perfect. I’m your host, Chris [inaudible]. And as you heard in the intro today, we’re talking with biotic, shall it be out day? Welcome. Thank you so much for having me. I’m excited to be here. I’m excited to have you here. I was looking through your LinkedIn and the headline it says, and I sold my business to Bill Gates. So I feel like that’s where we have to start because no one else can say that. That’s amazing.

Very few people can say that you know, but I figured, you know, it’d be we’re in business after I’ll be entrepreneurs. You better put the hook right in there where everybody can catch it.

Chris:

Yeah. You’re a marketer I can tell.

Beate:

Yes, exactly. So yes, I indeed sold the business to Bill Gates. And my story is one, um, that made me come out of a decade of disasters. And this is literally, you know, this, uh, pandemic is my, is my seventh natural disaster that I’m facing. And so I was eventually $135,000 in debt as a single mom, an immigrant with a small child after recessions fires, flood earthquakes, and tsunami, and nine 11, trying to figure out how in the world am I gonna ever get out of this disaster? And I had written a letter to the president of the United States because I’m talking to entrepreneurs. So I want to tell you that part of the story, because why wouldn’t you write a letter to the president of the United States? And I said, listen, it’s time that you helped me. I’ve done everything. I, you know, I said, I was going to do, I’m a good citizen.

I’m doing what I can, but I’m, I’m so behind. And I get a letter from the White House and it puts me in touch with the small business administration helped me to, I know it’s crazy. They helped me to restructure my business plan. So I was able to qualify for a fixed 10-year loan SBA back that freed up my line of credit. And that brought me three months later to break even 18 months later, I’m the world leader in celebrity home selling into 97 countries in the world. And the Bill Gates company comes and says, can you tell us how you do it? And I said, no, you want it, you pay for it. And so they made me an offer to go to refuse.

Chris:

So we’re 90 seconds in, and you’ve already given the, uh, an amazing piece of advice, which is to really just aim high, like who else would, would write a letter to the president. That’s really cool. Um, and, and that launched you into this opportunity. It sounds like.

Beate:

Well, what it really did is I, I believe, you know, as we talk about entrepreneurship and certainly figuring out how to make it through this finding opportunities after, you know, survival finding opportunities and then recovery, the really, uh, the big idea here is that you need to step out of this panic and fear and think about I’m going to do whatever I can, no matter how crazy outlandish and idiotic, it might sound like write a letter to the president. But what if, what if something really comes of it? What if something really happens? And so I didn’t, you know, opposite the president of the United States never read that letter, but it did put an action into place that changed so much for me. And so that’s, that’s the aiming high. Yes. You just cannot ever give up. You have to always look for the opportunity.

Chris:

We had another guest Bill Gallagher on the show who talked about making bold requests and how this is the time. Like you cannot make a request that’s too bold. You might as well ask because there’s nothing worse that can happen. Then they say, no, right.

Beate:

And if you say, if you get a no, you’re no different than you are where you are at right now. But if somebody says, yes, you’re somewhere different.

Chris:

Right? So if, if someone’s sitting around right now and, and scrambling, trying to figure out what to do, I saw you have a course on your site and you seem to be an expert and kind of transitioning people from some sort of talent that they have into the ability to make money from that. Can you talk a little bit about that?

Beate:

Yes, absolutely. So, um, I’ve, I’ve developed something that I call the Five Star Success Blueprint. So I’ve been, I’ve literally built thousands and thousands and thousands of businesses, uh, for, you know, many of my clients. And there is a particular blueprint really on how business is being built. You do not have to reinvent the wheel because in, in the cadence of a business building, I’ve identified it as my Five Star Success Blueprint in the first step, you turn the talent into a business, transforming passion into profits. So this is where we really flush out. What is it, what you’re good at? What motivates you? What’s your mission? How does this all tie in? And I’m going to give you one piece here that I believe that your listeners might be really benefiting from a lot of times, we’re sort of trained off overcoming what we believe we’re not good at. And we work really hard to master a skill that we forget that the God given gift we have is really the ticket. So instead of trying to overcome what you don’t know, you know, double down on the stuff you really good at, and that’s usually your super skill, that is the key to your future or to your future business. And so that’s it. Yeah, because why would you work hard on something that’s easy?

Chris:

You know, similar, I hear people say they dedicate so much of their attention to the low performers in their company instead of really investing in the high performers. And it sounds like that’s the same with your own skill set, invest in the areas that you’re already strong in and make them stronger, as opposed to trying to level out your weaknesses.

Beate:

Exactly. And to that point, you, you really hire to your weaknesses. Uh, you do what you’re best at you figure out what you’re not good at. And then you let other people do the stuff you either don’t like, or you suck.

Chris:

So, so step one is turning your talent into a business and identifying what that is. Is there any kind of exercise where people can figure out what they’re good at?

Beate:

Oh, that’s good, that’s a really good question. I believe that a lot of people struggle with that because they could be doing so many different things. I really have a whole process that’s that’s put into place. I probably would start with your own personal, why, what matters to you and looking at what you’re really, really good at, and then, uh, identifying the kind of people or the type of clients you want to work with. If you have these three elements, you know what you like, you know what, you’re good at? You, you like, you know what you want to serve, then you can reverse engineer and figure out what is the people that are like, what’s my skillset. Being able to provide for them that will help them solve a problem, live a better life, be happier center fitter, or, you know, whatever that might be,

Chris:

Figure out what your, why is I had a friend who sold his business and it was a company he was not passionate about at all. And so in figuring out what to do next, he sent out this email to me and a bunch of his other friends. And he said, what do you think I’m good at? You know, me, what do you think I’m good at? And so I think that’s another way people could, you know, if they can’t figure it out themselves, ask, ask the people around you.

Beate:

I like that because you made a very, very good point. And I just had this conversation two days ago with someone and she says, I just don’t know what I’m passionate about. I don’t know what I like. I don’t know what I’m good at. So sometimes you eliminate what you hate and that sort of gets you in a, in a, in a background way to the same results. So if I know that, I, for sure don’t want to work with these people. I for sure don’t want to do that. I for sure don’t want to do that. Then you kind of start eliminating, you know, and I took her through the industries. I said, well, do you like real estate? And she says, absolutely not. I said, you know, do you do, do, do you like, uh, entertainment industry? Why would I want to be an entertainment industry? You know, so now you’re starting to eliminate things and then you see what’s left over and you go, Oh, that could be, that might be a good way to get started.

Chris:

You know, what’s crazy too, is people that have an interest in something or a passionate about something. I think they take for granted how much they know about that thing. Because if you’ve read a couple books or followed a few Facebook pages or whatever it is, you’ve probably done more than 90% of people out there. And you’re the expert in your circle of friends. So it’s probably just about deepening that, right? Recognizing it and deepening it.

Beate:

I believe that you know that in my, I actually have another program called the Unapologetic Value Proposition, which is where you figure out how to figure out what your super skill. And it actually asks that exact question is what is so easy for you and that you, that you kind of look at your friends and you said, dude, how can you not know that that is so easy to do? And you know, everybody should do that. I had an example when I was doing a training at Merck pharmaceuticals and I, you know, we’re sitting in this room and there’s this gentleman, he goes like, you know, I just don’t know what that is. And, and, and everybody else seems to figure it out, but me and I looked at him and I said, but it is so obvious. You are everybody like, shoo, you make it so easy to be around. You get everybody talking laughing, and you make everybody feel welcome. And, and, and part of the team. And he goes like, well, doesn’t everybody know how to do that as

Chris:

There it is. Okay, perfect. So if you’re listening, figure out what that thing is for you. So as we continue along in the five star success blueprint, that was step one, what’s step two,

Beate:

Step number two is how to sell more and feel good about it. So this is now the sore subject for a lot, a lot of people. So they go, well, you know, if I like it so much, if it’s so easy for me, you know, what can I charge for it? And, and then, uh, inevitably they attract all these people that go like, if it’s so easy for you, you should just give it away. You know, how dare you charge for it. And then, then you get like, kind of all funky about it. So there is a way to shift the mindset. I call it the shifting from selling to problem solving. If you focus on how to position it. So it solves other people’s problems. You never feel like you’re selling because you simply offer a solution to what people struggle with.

Chris:

Right? It’s like, if, and then you’re helping them. You know, if, if somebody’s obviously got this problem, a friend, if a friend was complaining and you had a solution, you would just plug in that solution for them. But it’s people for whatever reason think differently about sales. And so I think this one’s a hard one to overcome. If, if someone’s struggling with this, it’s like, how do they break past the mindset of being able to make an offer or ask for a price?

Beate:

I think it is really a mindset thing where you want to think about how you behave, right? So you, you get up in the morning, you out of coffee, you go buy coffee. You don’t even think about whether or not you need coffee. Uh, you, you know, your water faucet is broken. They go, and you don’t even think about it. You call the guy, he comes, you pay him money. He fixes it. So it’s really a natural principle that people are so accustomed with. So I believe it’s a projection of our own inadequacies or lack of self, or just our imposter syndrome, where we believe that something we’d love a passionate about. That’s easy for us. If we want to share with the world that somehow that doesn’t have value, or we listen to our family, whose job is to protect us from failure, who always tell us, not pardon me not to do something because it’s their job to not have you get hurt, but they don’t understand if you don’t try, you can’t succeed either. So you have to maneuver that. I believe it’s more than anything, a mindset issue. And if you have issues with money, you better overcome that. Like, yeah,

Chris:

I agree. It’s a, it’s hard to scale if you can’t break past that, because what you said, how to sell more and feel good about it. If you don’t feel good about every sale, you’re not going to want to sell more. So you’re going to sabotage yourself and limit your potential. Whereas if it’s something that you just love giving to people, and you feel like every sale is a win and it brings you up, then you just want to keep doing it.

Beate:

Yes. And I’ll give you another example on that. So I, I have these, um, private VIP days. And so I’ve, you know, because I’m such a system oriented and process oriented person, which I know you love, um, is, is about, uh, I can do what other people do in like month long coaching sessions. I literally do it in a day. People work with me for one day, they turn around and they, my fastest return on investment was these two consultants that walked away and closed the next day, a hundred thousand dollar deal.

Chris:

Nice. So you helped them break past something. There was something they were stuck on and that mindset has changed

Beate:

And it was, yeah. And then in their particular case, it was just the way they looked at sales because they recognize all the things that the clients needed, but they didn’t figure out what the client wanted. And then once we shifted that, giving the clients in pieces, what they wanted, you know, they made more sales than it would have done otherwise. So it really is about how do you approach that and how do you solve that in your head? And then how do you, uh, assign language? That’s a strong, powerful language where you just have a conversation like we are having, what’s the problem. Here’s what we can do. What do you think about that? Well, that’s how much that is. What do you think, you know, and done.

Chris:

Yeah. And, and so what you just touched on there at the end, I think, is important because anybody that feels this hesitation about making an offer or seeing a price, if that is not well-received, if there is hesitation from the buyer, it opens up this dialogue about, well, what’s your objection. What’s the problem here. And what that’s doing is letting you kind of reverse engineer the package that would work for that customer so that you can go back to the drawing board and figure out how to more scalably sell what you’re doing. So if you’ve got any of that hesitation and you’re listening to this, I would say, take a step back and figure out what’s causing the hesitation or ask your prospects what would be the perfect scenario. And maybe that’ll help you invent a better, easier to sell package.

Beate:

Exactly. And, you know, and let’s just give them one more tip, because you said the magic word packages. And I think that once you get your head around what this package pricing idea is, it really drives home the point because we are trained to assume that money, the price is the only objection. And it really isn’t. It is the value that the price is attached to. So once you figure that out, it becomes exponentially much easier to talk about it. Okay.

Chris:

Greate point. Okay. So let’s keep moving. I love this framework. So, uh, turn your talent into a business and then sell more and feel good about it. What’s the next step

Beate:

Authority platform building, because now, now you have to tell the world and how are you going to tell the world, are you going to hire lead generation? Are you going to be building funnels? Are you going to be doing this through social media, influencer marketing? So now we have so many different ways to build the business that you really have to deploy a strategy that gets this message out to the right people in the right kind of way. So if you, for example, go through, uh, influencer marketing, you have to be very clear who these influencers are because the influencers determine the target audience you’re going after. So influencer marketing is not influencer marketing. You know, it’s, it’s very specific. Or if you go a, a, the cold, cold calling route, you know, who, who are you going after? Is it a business? What’s the size of the business? What’s the industry of the business. What’s the problem of the business? How do you, how do you build that authority in that niche? Do you need to be speaking? And if you need to do public speaking, then which other, the conferences you need to go to, that these guys go do. So there’s a whole element of like, where do I go to get the message out?

Chris:

The idea of building authority is how do you tack on to the brand of the conference that you’re speaking at? Or how do you work with an influencer that has an audience that you can borrow? And it’s just aligning yourself with those other audiences. Right?

Beate:

Exactly. Because that means that if to become an authority in a particular category or in a subject, a subject matter expert, you have to drive down the message in this particular industry again and again, and again, and again, and again, until people start to pay attention. Yeah.

Chris:

So this is a really important when I think it’s kind of a turning point for your ability to grow a business, because, you know, I had a consulting firm for years, that was referral-based, but I was stuck in just my own little circle of the people that I knew. And it wasn’t until I started doing the things you mentioned, like the speaking, and wrote a book and get, you know, aligned with these other bigger names that you start to get exposed to bigger. And so you could be the best person in the world at something. But if no one knows about you, if no one’s ever heard of you, how are you going to grow that business?

Beate:

We called it the best kept secret problem.

Chris:

Huh? That’s a good way to, that’s a good name for it. Okay. So, so if you can cross that hurdle, hurdle, number three, and people find out about you what’s next.

Beate:

Now we’re talking about leadership. So this part is what I call a balanced leadership. This is the whole women’s code aspect of what I do, where I believe that in, you know, this is usually the shift from business owner to business leader, where now you’re doing less of the work. You have to train more people. You have to manage more people. You really step into much more of a leadership position. And a lot of business owners are then trying to do the mini me cloning, where they’ve tried to find people just like them that are good at 10,000 different things. And then they figure o

ut that they cannot grow their business because it is basically built up on cloning themselves, which is just stupid idiotic. If you’re doing it, stop it now the way to properly,

Chris:

You know, it’s funny I have to, I have to stop you because we, we had, when we launched Trainual, one of our ads was, it said, clone yourself. And it was saying like, you can’t do that. So here’s the next best thing. So that’s really funny that you said that

Beate:

There you go, because what happens is when you hold all the possessions that as you grow, you know, there’s a, it’s like a pyramid. So the pyramid widens underneath you and you sit at the top of the pyramid. And so now you have to look at what are the slices of this, this foundation and it’s sales and it’s marketing, and it’s HR and it’s manufacturing, it’s research and development. It’s all these different aspects of it. So you have to consciously think about your organizational chart and the growth idea of how do I, how do I build this? You have to also look at yourself and say, reality check. Yeah. What am I good at? What should I be doing? What should I not be doing? And then a lot of times the culture issue, we built these companies and they’re built by us. And then we have one person, two people, three, four, five, and it’s like a family.

And we, we go out together, we have lunch together. And then there comes a point where you cannot do that anymore. Now you’re the boss. And so this oversharing and the social and emotional aspect and the attachments do we have, you have with your employees is changing. So a lot of times at that point, that first level people you work with leaving because they are now not able to make that shift into a real business. They’re like that family kind of atmosphere. Now you’re all crushed because you feel like you made a mistake, but you really need that next level of personality to get you to that next level. So that’s part of this leadership component. It’s a lot of reality checks in a variety of different categories to just say, okay, are you ready for that?

Chris:

I feel like you just described 10 years of experience and put it into two minute description, because there’s so much in there that takes a long time to develop with how you change as a manager and building relationships and offloading responsibilities. I love the pyramid analogy because, you know, I just think of that. That’s that slice at the top of the pyramid, getting smaller and smaller as the pyramid gets bigger. And how do you allocate your time? I know I talked to a lot of early, uh, entrepreneurs that they’re wearing so many hats, and it’s a constant challenge to figure out which of these things is at a hundred percent capacity that I should hire someone for. And then I, now I’m back down to 80% to fill up the rest of my buckets. Um, but that is, that’s something that just takes, I imagine, a long time for people to develop, right?

Beate:

Yes and no. So if you send them to me, I do it in a day. So this is really, I mean, literally I think, because I’ve done this so many times and because it’s, this is, you know, talking about the super skill. It is so easy for me. I cannot believe people struggle with us. So, um, the, the idea of, you know, I just have to listen to it and hear somebody talk about it. And then it’s like my brain, just volunteers, this, you know, like I literally see these images and as like, you know, wait a minute, is that what you just said? And then we white-boarded out and boom, you know, you, you can do that. But what you said is correct. If you try to do that by yourself, while you’re in it, like you’re inside the pyramid and you try to look up in the front and the back, it’s not really going to happen. You have to, now, you don’t have perspective. You need somebody to help you yank you out of it and has an objectivity about it, which is why we have consultants and programs and, and tools available. You know, nobody gets to the top alone. I mean, unless you want to be at the top alone, you can try to do that, but you need people.

Chris:

Well, tell us a little bit about the woman’s code.

Beate:

All right. So the women’s code was designed by me because I realized that, um, after I sold the company to bill Gates, they asked me to come on as a senior director for global entertainment. So suddenly I’m running the entertainment division for a Bill Gates company worldwide. And I recognize as I’m in this corporate setting, I mean, this is the man, you know, it’s like founded Microsoft, right? Covanta Microsoft. And I see that there’s so much in this corporate setting and in these worlds and these business worlds, how they’re set up that are stacked against women. And there’s a bias against women, you know, the gender pay gap. And I found that women have a hard time to speak up and to, to find their place really out in the, in the work. And I saw that men have a code, which is the men’s code, and it’s unspoken.

Chris:

You don’t talk about it except me, of course. And you, you, you, you know, and they might have a scoring system and men have a quid pro quo system. And when a guy says, remember the thing I did for you, the favor I did for you is calling in a score, right? So once too, once you recognize how that works, you see why it worked so well for men and why men succeed at such a high level. And then you look at women and women just can’t bloody figure it out because they, you know, we were trained to be competitive with each other. We always worried about is that, you know, bleep going to try to steal my guy is the woman after my job. Whereas a man walks into a company and says, I want this guy to be after my job. Actually, I brought John here to be my replacement because you know what, Mark, I’m going after your job, because Mark, you are going after Sam’s job.

Beate:

And so when Sam gets to job, market’s the job. And then John gets, I mean, it’s a perfect succession training. Women cannot think like that. So I founded the women’s code because I felt that in the, in the thinking of how we believe business works and the business development, the whole female side is missing. So I said if we have the women’s code and I can make business owners understand what that even means and how to maximize the power of that part. And we identify and clearly communicate what the men’s code is without judgment. Hello. And we connect the both of them. Then we have the full infinity circle in a business. We can move from female to male and get all voices who are diversity of thought engagement being seen for who you are, self-realization. Self-expression.

Chris:

Well, that’s amazing that you’re closing the gap and, and, uh, and, and developing that system. We are, I’m proud to say we’re more than 50% women here at Trainual. So we’ve got a strong representation, but let’s close it out with, uh, with number five here, uh, to, to finish your, your, uh, your system.

Beate:

So number five, our growth strategies. So that’s the actual growth architecture because that’s when we go in and we look at automation and we look at, uh, how do you, you know, deploying systems that are doubling and tripling numbers, because that’s the part where your business needs to be scaled up pretty quickly. So when you have the, you know, you know what it is that you’re doing, you know how to sell it, you know who to go after to grow the business, you are a strong leader now, how do you get that business to just soar and explode? And so in this particular case, it’s very customized as you can,

Beate:

Where we whiteboard out bottlenecks in the business, we do SWOT analysis, SWOT analysis, team, SWAT analysis, SWOT analysis, and looking at vertical expansion opportunities. You know, like we’ve had, I’ve had a strategy session. I just did with someone who is a, probably one of the most prolific photographers I know, and she can photograph now, of course. So we came up with an idea on how to build an online course that solves the problems that these dances are having right now. And, and as we are doing this, she says, I’m going to not just do that for now. That’s actually a vertical, like pushing for a passive income stream that I didn’t even think about because I’m a dance photographer. So there are so many opportunities out there where you can create these alternative income streams that you thought about. But again, you know, this is the planning portion of business where you have to take the time and make the plan who can help you flush this out.

Chris:

Well, that’s great. So, I mean, between those five steps, you really talk about the whole life cycle of a business from just the coming up with the initial idea to perfecting the package and the price and scaling your sales system and developing as a leader, and then building the infrastructure to scale. So I love the framework. I think people can take so much from this and if they are developing services of their own, think about what you just heard it as a framework for offering packages and programs. And what you just described is it sounds like the system of your business, which is, which is genius. So kudos to you for developing that. Um, as we wrap up here, the last thing we do, we call it the double tap, which is just a five question, simple five question thing. If you could just say whatever, the first thing that comes to mind for you. Okay. First question, what’s a brand you think has perfected its process that you admire.

Beate:

It’s actually a small local brand here in Lausanne is called outdoor tech, and then do all these, uh, getting just an appending. I love their messaging. I love their product. And, uh, I first found them on Kickstarter because I needed to have these ads, phones inside, kinda I’m a skier. Uh, and so ever since I think I have every single one,

Chris:

That’s great. Who’s someone that’s coached or mentored you.

Beate:

Uh, I have a colleague in need, uh, training and development industry by the name of Bob [inaudible], who does, uh, a lot of executive coaching. So he heard about me talking about the, um, women’s you pay me, I’ll help you.

Chris:

Great. Your favorite book or podcast aside from yours, I should have clarified, but thank you.

Beate:

Yes. Uh, probably my, my favorite podcast is Conscious Millionaire from JV Crum, this or err, which is done super positive. They’re very powerful podcasts. And one of my favorite books, one of the books that gets pumped by Darren Hardy, because it just puts it together. That’s small steps, you know, lead to big results, step by step by step.

Chris:

Perfect. Two more, most entertaining person you follow online.

Beate:

And now it’s actually a girlfriend of mine. Her name is Tawny English, and just her sense of fashion. Her mother is a hoot and she is an introvert and I’m an extrovert. And just following her, keeps me cracked up every time.

Chris:

And then one app you can’t live without.

Beate:

There’s actually two, one is crisp. And Chris is an app that does noise reduction for, uh, for conference calls. So as I’ve been in construction in my house, turning on crews would never know that there’s hammering sewing, and major construction. Those that are, is a transcription of his, they give you 600 free minutes a month, so you can upload these files and get a full-blown transcription for free. And I think it’s super cheap if you do the unlimited plan for the year. So these are my favorite.

Chris:

All right. Great recommendations. Well, I want to thank you again for coming on here. I think everyone has a lot to learn from your five-step process and framework. And please, if you’re listening to this, please, uh, go and follow up via day and listened to everything that she’s doing because she has a lot of knowledge to share. So thank you again for being here. Hey, thanks for listening to Process Makes Perfect. If you’re listening on your earbuds on a run in the car, we also have a version on YouTube. So if you want to see this in color video with me interviewing all these great guests, check it out on YouTube, just search Chris Ronzio and you’ll find my channel on there. If you found this helpful, we’d love for you to leave a review or rate the podcast. If you found the information valuable, please share it with a friend, a family member, or anyone else you think could benefit from the information. Remember to connect with me @chrisronzio on all social media platforms or the company @Trainual. That’s Train-ual like a training manual, everywhere that you want to follow us. Thanks again for watching or listening. And we hope to see you next time.

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